Ericsson positions LTE for 700 MHz deployments

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When it comes to the FCC’s ongoing auction of 700 MHz spectrum, the buzz around WiMAX has been louder than a Georgia sawmill on a busy day. Even the WiMAX Forum has entered the picture with plans to develop specifications for 700 MHz spectrum adding to the noise and creating the general impression that WiMAX will drown out any other wireless broadband user.

Ericsson, though, maintains that WiMAX is not the only way to use this chunk of air being abandoned by broadcasters and acquired for multiple billions of dollars by an as-yet unnamed crowd of potential broadband wireless service providers. There’s also HSPA and its offspring LTE and that’s where Ericsson’s focused.
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Femto Forum crowns TR-069 protocol as new management standard

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It’s official: The Femto Forum has declared its members will be using the Broadband Forum’s TR-069 popular protocol to manage femtocell devices.

Surprising no one, TR-069 was the odds-on favorite for the role, being deployed already in roughly 30 million devices that support the 2/3G service. Indeed, the Forum noted that many members had already decided to go with TR-609 for femtocell management, especially diagnostics and troubleshooting. TR-069 already supports (self)-installation, a key requirement for widespread deployment, and provisioning functions including remote diagnostics and firmware upgrades, as well as RF interference reduction; work is ongoing to add new functionality to the standard near-term.
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China’s handset blues

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China’s handset blues

Production is rising, but new entrants pose definite threats

If you buy a handset today, chances are the model, be it Nokia, Motorola, Samsung or uncanny names like Bird or Gionee, is made in China. In 2007, China produced nearly 550 million handsets, about 45 percent of world total, of which over 400 million were sold outside of China. Mobile handset production is expected to rise again this year by about 10-15 percent.

Mobile handsets are a big business. There are 115 companies competing in all categories, from strip-down low-end models to “Blackberry”-like smart phones, with price in hundreds of dollars apart. Anytime you walk into an electronic store or handset retail outlet, the number of models on display can make your head spin, and people use handsets in different shapes and sounds. The chief reason for a booming handset market in China is handset is sold separate from service plans, so that customers first choose the model they like before signing up for the service; in the West, mobile handsets are virtually free with purchase of wireless service plan, but the supply of brands and models are usually limited.
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